Life Rupis – Conservation of Egyptian Vulture and Bonelli’s Eagle in the Douro Valley’ (LIFE14 NAT/PT/000855) is a transboundary conservation project, with a duration of 4 years (2015 – 2019), co-financed by the European Union through the LIFE Programme funding instrument.

The project, which takes place on the Portuguese-Spanish border,across the protected areas of the International Douro River, the valley of Águeda River, and Arribes del Duero, aims to strengthen the populations of Egyptian Vulture and Bonelli’s Eagle in these areas by reducing mortality and improving breeding success. Other raptor species like the Black Vulture and the Red Kite will also benefit from the project actions.






HIGHLIGHT
III OBSERVARRIBAS | The Iberian Nature Festival celebrates the unique nature of the Arribas Do Douro.

From May 31 to June 2, 2019, binoculars and photography cameras will once again be the most seen accessories on the streets of Miranda do Douro. For three days, hundreds of birdwatchers and nature lovers will come to discover the birds, landscapes and traditions of the region, in the III ObservArribas: The Iberian Nature Festival of Arribas do Douro.

Sign up here www.observarribas.com.


News
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Searching for Egyptian Vultures
2019-08-09
Last week, the Life Rupis team was playing "Where's Waldo"... with Egyptian Vulture nests. We managed to equip a few chicks with GPS transmitters.
Cinereous Vulture: quick international action prevented disaster
2019-07-18
Carrascalinho has been giving us quite a scare over the past few weeks after he returned to an open area full of wind turbines in Galicia. Together, we managed to track the bird’s movements, check what was attracting him to the area and shut down the turbines temporarily!
The mystery of Egyptian Vulture Douro's lost GPS transmitter
2019-06-18
Recently, one of the adult Egyptian Vultures we’ve been following for the last two years showed some unusual activity which had us worried. Having travelled over 4,000km to get back to the Douro Canyon, had Douro suffered an injury? Was the bird in need of assistance?